Northshore Home

Northshore Home Summer 2018

Northshore Home magazine highlights the best in architectural design, new construction and renovations, interiors, and landscape design.

Issue link: http://read.uberflip.com/i/1006262

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 27 of 131

26 SUMMER 2018 kitchens nshoremag.com/nshorehome/ The ceramics on display, in fact, influence much of the design of the English-inspired space, says Gagne, the principal of Holly Gagne Design in Rowley and a frequent collaborator with Jewett Farms, headquar- tered in York, Maine, and now also in the Boston Design Center. Gagne recalls her first visits with Jane Flanagan to hammer out a plan. "Jane was very directed in her vision," Gagne recalls. "She pulled out accessories, including a lot "Every cabinet was thought out with regard to what specifically was going where; this was critical to ensure the minimalist feel would actually be successful for their everyday use." —Holly Gagne The open-shelf concept allows a feeling of minimalism where materials can be focal points, Gagne says. of ceramics." The combination of ceramic tile and pottery and other accessories drove the color palette and mate- rial textures: "It was so good in helping us establish the aesthetic, what she wanted the feel to be. Jane's vision set us on a strong design path from day one." The reclaimed barnboard became a natural way to balance an air of rusticity with a classic, clean Europe- an look. Sourced from a demolished barn in Ohio, the barnboard rendered the color and texture that only natural factors can provide—time, weather, and sun. The planks were not easy to find. "Many of them were too rustic or not the right style," Gagne says. "Jane wanted minimalist and clean, but also rustic." Jewett Farms woodworkers treated the wood as an art form, patiently shaping the fragile, often warped, boards and meticulously mitering the corners, with- out affecting the face of the boards. The character of the wood, along with the hand- crafted tile and the Flanagans' beautiful kitchenware, called for a hand-touched, accessible mood, Gagne says. "I always try to incorporate natural materials into design. Here I wanted clean lines, too. It felt right for the house and the suburban setting." A few key design techniques establish the clean, modern farmhouse look. Open shelving was one. "Many people are consumed with filling a kitchen with cabinetry, to have maximum storage," Gagne says. The open-shelf concept allows a feeling of minimalism where materials can be focal points, she says. "Every cabinet was thought out with regard to what specifically was going where; this was critical to

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Northshore Home - Northshore Home Summer 2018