Northshore Magazine

Northshore November 2019

Northshore magazine showcases the best that the North Shore of Boston, MA has to offer.

Issue link: http://read.uberflip.com/i/1182004

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 33 of 123

NORTHSHOREMAG.COM 32 NOVEMBER 2019 FAC E S + P L AC E S has morphed into a food destination, and his excitement about Amesbury's growing foodie reputation is palpable. "The more great places that are in town, the more people come," he says. Indeed, Amesbury's tight-knit network of restaurateurs and food entrepreneurs is one of the things that makes it such a fun and charming place to experience a truly local food culture. Take, for instance, Brewery Silvaticus, which opened in one of the revamped down- town mill buildings about two years ago. The space leans into its industrial pedigree in its décor, and is refreshingly empty of TVs, in- stead focusing on creating a laid-back atmo- sphere reminiscent of German beer gardens. "Our goal is to push more of a European aesthetic," says Jay Bullen, president and head of brewhouse operations. "We really wanted to replicate that in the whole experience." Along with its beers, which focus on That's not the only way restaurant own- ers—the majority of whom also actually work in their restaurants—help each other and their customers. Gove says Amesbury restaurateurs have actually been known to call other restau- rants in town to get diners a table if their own dining room is full or has a long wait. "Our food entrepreneurs have built really strong relationships with each other and created a really unique experience," Gove says. "That personal level of service and the connection that the owners have with each other is unique." Also unique are the restaurants, cafés, and bistros themselves. They each offer a singu- lar experience that's unlike anything else in town, filling their own individual niches while bolstering each other creatively. "I feel like because we are a community of a lot of crafters and artists, that we are more open to the unusual or the art of it all," says Antoinette Whitney, owner of Ov dia Artisan Chocolates, a chocolate café and espresso bar that makes all of its chocolates on-site. Ov dia is slightly hidden behind another building on Main Street, but once you step inside and experience the intoxicating aroma of coffee and chocolate, you'll wonder how you ever lived without the place. "We're kind of tucked away, but we're that treasure that you find," Whitney says. Just like Amesbury, the city it calls home. "Our food entrepreneurs have built really strong relationships with each other and created a really unique experience. at personal level of service and the connection that the owners have with each other is unique." — Kassandra Gove, executive director of the Amesbury Chamber of Commerce Silvaticus is just one of the brewhouses in the town. Belgian farmhouse ales and German-style lagers, Brewery Silvaticus serves locally made small bites, including pickled veggies from K's Kitch'n Broad Street Cannery. The small artisanal producer operates out of Kitchen Local, a permitted, shared-use commercial kitchen where dozens of "food- preneurs" have launched and operated their businesses since it opened in January 2013. "There's a lot of buying of other people's products," Lisa Sutton, Kitchen Local's founder and owner, says of the food business owners in town, who often turn to each other to source their products. For instance, in addition to the locally made pickles at Brewery Silvaticus, you might find the Sacred Cod Food Truck and their haddock sandwiches, "piegato" pizzas from Laura Crown Company, or handmade pierogi from Polish Prince Pierogi, all of which operate out of Kitchen Local. PHOTOGRAPHS BY DOUG LEVY (TOP), BY JARED CHARNEY (BOTTOM)

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Northshore Magazine - Northshore November 2019