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Academic Integrity In the Age of Online Learning

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Wiley—Academic Integrity In the Age of Online Learning 2 In a May 2020 survey, Wiley asked 789 instructors about their experiences and found that 54 percent had not taught online prior to the emergency shift to remote learning. When COVID-19 forced higher education institutions around the world to move courses online, the learning environment for instructors and students changed abruptly. A host of challenges for instructors emerged as a result of the move, but what quickly became one of the most prominent issues was perceived academic misconduct. A full 93 percent of instructors surveyed believe that students are more likely to cheat online than in person. And with the 72 percent of instructors now using technology to deliver their exams and assessments, this problem appeared more pronounced than ever. of respondents feel students are more likely to cheat online than in-person. Not more or less likely More likely Significantly more likely As schools all over the country cancelled in-person classes and moved instruction to an online format beginning in March 2020, the majority of instructors surveyed perceive online learning as more conducive to academic dishonesty. 93% Faculty agree that students are 62 percent more likely to cheat in an online course compared to an in-person class. HOWEVER… Over 95 percent of students believe cheating happens both online and in-person. 1 62% 95% Less likely Significantly less likely Cheating in online course 31% 62% 5% 1% 1%

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