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2022 Midwest Vegetable Guide

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Field Production Information 30 Midwest Veg Guide 2022 Production Tables Yield of Vegetable Crops Crop Expected Yields in Tons per Acre Average Good Excellent Asparagus 1 1.5 2 Bean, snap 2 3 4 Cabbage 13 15 20 Cantaloupe 10 15 19 Cucumber (slicing) 9 12 15 Cucumber (pickling, hand harvest) 6 10 12 Onion 13 18 23 Pepper, green 14 17 20 Potato (fall) 10 15 20 Pumpkin 10 15 25 Spinach 6 8 10 Summer squash 10 13 16 Sweet corn 4.5 8 10 Sweet potato 7 12 15 Tomato (fresh market) 11 13 15 Tomato (processing) 25 29 33 Watermelon 15 20 25 This table only provides general yield estimates for new or prospective growers. The USDA-National Agricultural Statistics Service Vegetable Survey provides more accurate information. Postharvest Handling and Storage Life of Fresh Vegetables A lack of adequate refrigeration and cooling will shorten the shelf-life and lower the quality of fresh vegetables. Cucumber, eggplant, lettuce, green or ripe pepper, potato, snap bean, summer squash, and tomato are among the most susceptible vegetables to chilling or freezing injury. Some cold injury symptoms that can make vegetables unmarketable. The most typical include pitting, water- soaked spots, browning, surface decay, and, in pepper and tomato, failure to ripen. The following list of recommended storage condition information is adapted from The Commercial Storage of Fruits, Vegetables, and Florist and Nursery Stocks (USDA- ARS Agriculture Handbook Number 66, ars.usda.gov ), Knott's Handbook for Vegetable Growers (Donald N. Maynard and George J. Hochmuth, 5th ed., 2007), and Properties and Recommended Conditions for Long-Term Storage of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (Marita Cantwell, University of California-Davis, Postharvest Technology website, postharvest.ucdavis.edu). Vegetable Storage Conditions Temp (˚F) Relative Humidity (%) Relative Storage Life Asparagus 36 95-100 2-3 weeks Beans, snap 40-45 95 7-10 days Beets & carrots, bunched 32 98-100 10-14 days Broccoli 32 95-100 10-14 days Cabbage, late 32 98-100 5-6 months Cantaloupe 36-41 95 2-3 weeks Cauliflower 32 95-98 3-4 weeks Cucumber 50-54 85-90 10-14 days Eggplant 50-54 90-95 1-2 weeks Greens (collards, kale, & spinach) 32 95-100 10-14 days Lettuce 32 98-100 2-3 weeks Okra 45-50 90-95 7-10 days Onions, dry 32 65-70 1-8 months Onions, green 32 95-100 3 weeks Peas, in pods 32 90-98 1-2 weeks Peas, southern 40-41 95 6-8 days Pepper, green 45-55 90-95 2-3 weeks Pepper, ripe 42-45 90-95 1 week Potato, early a 90-95 a Potato, late b 90-95 b Pumpkin 54-59 50-70 2-3 months Radish 32 95-100 1-2 months Rhubarb 32 95-100 2-4 weeks Squash, summer 40-45 95 1-2 weeks Squash, winter 54-59 50-70 c Sweet corn 32 95-98 2-5 days, up to 21 days for supersweet cultivars Sweet potato 55-59 85-95 4-7 months Tomato, light red 50-55 90-95 1 week Tomato, mature- green 50-60 90-95 1-2 weeks Tomato, firm-ripe 46-50 85-90 3-5 weeks Turnip root 32 95 4-5 months Watermelon 50-60 90 2-3 weeks a Most summer-harvested potatoes are not stored. However, they can be held 4-5 months at 40˚F if cured 4-5 days at 60- 70˚F before storage. They can be stored 2-3 months at 50˚F without curing. Potatoes for chips should be held at 70˚F or conditioned for best chip quality. b Fall-harvested potatoes should be cured at 50-60˚F and high relative humidity for 10-14 days. Storage temperatures for seed or table stock should be lowered gradually to 38-40˚F. Potatoes intended for processing should be stored at 50-55˚F. Those stored at lower temperatures or with a high reducing sugar content should be conditioned at 70˚F for 1-4 weeks or until trial cooking tests are satisfactory. c Winter-squash varieties differ in storage life. Acorn squash can be stored for 35-55 days, butternut squash for 60-90 days, and Hubbard squash for 180 days.

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