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2022 Midwest Vegetable Guide

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Pesticide Application and Safety Midwest Veg Guide 2022 43 Conversions for Liquid Pesticides on Small Areas Convert per acre rates to smaller areas by first converting the rate to fl. oz. or dry oz. Then, find 100 sq. ft. rates by dividing by 435.6, or 1,000 sq. ft. rates by dividing by 43.56. You can convert fl. oz. or dry oz. back to a larger unit from there. Or, use this table, which approximates the rate reductions into common measuring increments. Rate per Acre Rate per 1,000 Square Feet Rate per 100 Square Feet 1 pint 0.75 tablespoon 0.25 teaspoon 1 quart 1.5 tablespoons 0.5 teaspoon 2 quarts 3 tablespoons 1 teaspoon 1 gallon 6 tablespoons 2 teaspoons 25 gallons 4.5 pints 1 cup 50 gallons 4.5 quarts 1 pint 75 gallons 7 quarts 1.5 pints 100 gallons 9 quarts 1 quart Check the pesticide label for the particular crop, pest, and site of your planned use. Evaluating Water Quality and Compatibility of Pesticides Before Tank-Mixing Water that is added to the pesticide spray tank may vary in pH, hardness and other qualities. These variations in water types may influence the effectiveness of the pesticide application. To learn about this subject, see The Impact of Water Quality on Pesticide Performance (Purdue Extension publication PPP-86) available from the Education Store, edustore.purdue.edu. Read the label and follow directions. If the label states, "Do not mix with other products," that direction must be followed. If using different products, and one label states, "Add last to spray tank", that direction must be followed If the label states, "Do not use adjuvants", that direction must be followed. Follow these steps to do a jar test of a new mixture of chemistries to ensure compatibility in the tank. These ratios will approximate 25 gallons per acre. Between each ingredient, let it stand for a few minutes to see if there is a reaction. If there is a precipitate, or the material greases out, or heats up, don't use it in the field. The allowable separation in the jar depends on the amount of agitation in your equipment. 1. In a 1 quart jar, add 1 pint of the same water or liquid fertilizer that will be used in the field. 2. Add and agitate 1 1/2 teaspoon of any wettable dry product(s) for each pound per acre to be used. Formulation abbreviations include W, WP, WDG, DF, D, or G. 3. Next, add and agitate 1 teaspoon for each quart per acre of any liquid flowables and suspensions to be used. Formulation abbreviations include FS, F, WS, SC. 4. Next, add and agitate 1 teaspoon for each quart per acre of any microencapsulated or emulsifiable concentrates to be used. Formulation abbreviations include ME, EC, or E. 5. Finally, add and agitate 1 teaspoon for each quart per acre of any surfactants and solutions to be used. Formulation abbreviations include CS, S, or L. Storing Pesticides for Next Season Growers who store pesticides always should consider safety and product quality, whether they will store products for a few weeks or a year or more. It is best not to have leftover pesticides. However, there usually are surplus pesticides at the end of the season because preseason purchases often are very economical. Before storing pesticides always: 1. Read product labels. Certain formulations or products have special storage requirements, which are printed on the label. 2. Make certain the label is in good condition (legible) to know what is in the container and for directions for safe, effective, and legal use. 3. Write the purchase or delivery date on the label. Store the oldest materials near the front of the storage area and use older or opened products first. Products that are several years old may not be effective. 4. Keep an up-to-date inventory of pesticides to assist in purchase decisions and in emergencies. a. Maintain storage temperatures between 32°F and 100°F. Ventilation is important for storage of most pesticides. Keep pesticides dry and out of direct sunlight. 5. Store herbicides away from other pesticides to prevent use mix-up, contamination, and possible plant damage. Never store pesticides with food or seed or near food or drinking water. 6. Permanently identify and lock pesticide storage areas. 7. Keep a supply of cat litter or other absorbent material in the storage to scatter over spills of liquid chemicals. 8. Hang a Class B inflammable liquids fire extinguisher nearby.

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