2014

March

Big Y World Class Market's Life In Balance Issue is filled with game day entertaining ideas, deliciously quick recipes, cooking tips, healthy make-overs, cold and flu and much more!

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DILEMMA SOLVING A FISHY Have a question for Big Y's dietitians? Contact Carrie Taylor, RDN, LDN and Andrea Luttrell, RDN, LDN by: Visit BigY.com's LivingWell Eating Smart ® Web page and post a question Send e-mails to: livingwell@bigy.com Write to: Living Well 2145 Roosevelt Ave. PO Box 7840 Springfield, MA 01102 BigYLWESTeam Follow us on Twitter – @BigYLWES Become a fan on Facebook – LivingWellEatingSmart THE DISH ON FISH Fish is a great source of lean protein and essential nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids. Fish such as albacore tuna, wild caught salmon, farmed oysters and farmed rainbow trout tend to be higher in omega-3 fats than traditional white fish. Why pay attention to the omega-3s found in fish? The American Heart Association® cites foods containing omega-3 fatty acids may help lower inflammation and insulin resistance as well as improve cholesterol. PAIRING AND PREPARING Good news: There is no wrong way to cook fish. You can grill, bake, broil, sauté and even poach fish. Fillets are quick and easy to cook on the grill or bake in the oven. Fish is generally cooked at high temperatures for short periods of time to retain moisture. To ensure your fish is done and safe to serve, use a simple instant-read thermometer. Inserted at the thickest portion of the fillet, it will be fully cooked when the temperature reaches 145°F. If you do not plan on cooking fish immediately, it is important to freeze fresh cuts. Freezing is the easiest, safest way to keep fish for an extended period of time — it can be stored for 3 to 4 months in the freezer. When you are ready to cook frozen fish, simply thaw it in the refrigerator the night before. According to the FDA, washing fish can spread bacteria to your sink and countertops rather than disinfect it. Bacteria cannot live through the high temperatures of cooking, so as long as fish is cooked thoroughly there is no need to rinse it! To rinse or not to rinse? IT IS NOT UNCOMMON TO HEAR HOW GREAT FISH IS FOR YOU. However, for many people, eating or cooking fish can be uncharted water. How should it smell? What will it taste like? And how in the world do I cook it? These are all common concerns when it comes to eating fish. If you are trying fish for the first time, or simply need a healthier way to add flavor, look no further. TRY THIS: Add fish to the recipes you already love. Fish goes great in soups, stews and pasta recipes where it can soak up savory flavors. Looking for something new? Mix and match some of our simple suggestions for a creative new recipe in seconds. Pairing your fish with toppings, seasonings or stuffing is a fun, easy way to add flavor without excess calories. S E A S O N I T GARLIC PARSLEY DILL BASIL LEMON PEPPER I T LEMON PEPPER S T U F F I T AVOCADO SPINACH SWISS CHARD MUSHROOMS PEPPERS (sweet or spicy) Add fish to the Fish goes great in soups, stews and pasta recipes where it can soak up savory flavors. Looking suggestions for a creative new recipe in seconds. Pairing your fish with toppings, seasonings or stuffing is a fun, easy way to add S E A LEMON PEPPER SESAME SEEDS CHOPPED WALNUTS FRESH SQUEEZED LEMON JUICE FRESH SALSA WHOLE WHEAT BREADCRUMBS T O P I T

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