The Groundsman

March 2014

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TECHNICAL UPDATE 28 the Groundsman March 2014 Visit www.iog.org for more information and digital editions osted by Chris Clark, executive chairman of Rigby Taylor, the RTechnical seminar at Manchester's Old Trafford stadium saw industry experts present overviews of SUDs issues and how best the 130 delegates could keep on the right side of the law: • Dr Ruth Mann of STRI detailed the implications for the workplace; • Consultant Peter Corbett spoke about spraying efficacy and efficiency; • Andrew Mcmahon of Rigby Taylor explained the essential role of nutrition in managed turf; • James Dixon of Bargam highlighted sprayer testing and servicing; and • Stephen Kateley of BFS focused on effective spray targeting. An Old Trafford-based seminar on the Sustainable Use Directive (SUD) presented delegates with a greater understanding and awareness of the EU legislation, as Rigby Taylor's Richard Fry reports Dr Mann said that while many of SUD's requirements were likely to already be met by those in the workplace, it was now essential that organisations needed to show proof that this was the case. She stated that everyone involved needed to pay due attention to factors such as ensuring adequate training, proper monitoring and testing of equipment, correct selection of products, proper storage and handling, as well as the steps necessary in the mitigation of risks to water pollution. In the case of pesticides, SUD is intended to introduce, across the EU, a greater degree of uniformity of good practice. It aims to achieve the sustainable use of pesticides specifically by reducing the risks and H Stay on the right side of the SUD law By: Richard Fry impacts of pesticide use on human health and the environment, and it promotes integrated pest management and alternative approaches/techniques such as non-chemical substitutes. In terms of spraying, it was stated that as from November 2016, every 3m boom sprayer would have to be tested every three years and any smaller sprayer every six years. This was further confirmed by James Dixon who recommended that spray operators and their managers have the machines serviced regularly and fully calibrated to ensure the correct volume of material was hitting its intended target. He emphasised that as much as 20 per cent of the product could be mis-applied when spraying with worn nozzles and through drift. Lighting rigs at Manchester's Old Trafford Stadium, venue of the SUD seminar

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