Printwear

December '14

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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6 0 | PRINTWEAR D EC E M B E R 20 1 4 approval, you can elect to offer an "in- the-thread" approval, either in person or through e-mailing photographs or scans. If you do this via email, colors should be previously agreed upon. After an internal check for quality, present the stitched sample to the customer. If the customer signs off on all details, the sample goes to the production floor and is the standard to measure the ac- tual run. Follow the process diligently, and any errors that get through the preview approvals are at least shared be- tween your company and the customer for an easier path to resolution. DEALING WITH DISASTERS Despite careful communication, the job could still go wrong because of operator error, malfunction, or oversight. Wheth- er it's the incorrect color, location, or even logo, the embroidery needs help. Now what? If the design is difficult to remove be- cause of small lettering, large fill-stitched areas, or the possibility of visible fabric damage, consider replacing the garment outright. Stitch removal is time intensive and risky, and the cost in manpower often outweighs the replacement of inexpen- sive commodity garments. The quality of your final product shapes your shop's reputation. Don't try to save a garment if it won't maintain your workmanship quality. That said, there are times when replacement isn't an option. The deadline might be too tight or the garment is rare or customer supplied. In such cases, covering the damage is a possibility. If the replacement design has open space and the garment would show scars from stitch re- moval, you can create custom patches and ap- pliqués to cover incorrect embroidery. To avoid excess stiffness from stitch fills over existing embroidery, stitch the correct design on an ap- pliqué and attach it with satin-stitched borders. This creates an attractive piece that saves a gar- ment without the hassles of stitch removal or the poor quality of overstitching. Final approvals based on stitched samples or snapshots allow customers to verify the stitch quality and execution is up to par. For a discerning customer, send physical samples directly for final approval. Sometimes embroidery must be seen in-person to be evaluat- ed. (Image courtesy Erich Campbell) Whether you have a fully featured shop and data management sys- tem, such as the one pictured, review your initial customer inter- view notes and make a refined, standardized presentation of all per- tinent information for your production staff. (Image courtesy Ce- leste Schwartz) the stitched sample to the customer. If the DEALING WITH DISASTERS Despite careful communication, the job could still go wrong because of operator error, malfunction, or oversight. Wheth er it's the incorrect color, location, or even logo, the embroidery needs help. Now what? cause of small lettering, large fill-stitched areas, or the possibility of visible fabric damage, consider replacing the garment outright. Stitch removal is time intensive and risky, and the cost in manpower often outweighs the replacement of inexpen sive commodity garments. The quality of your final product shapes your shop's Though computer-generat- ed digital previews don't ad- equately show the physical results of a design or the exact color of thread, a dig- ital preview allows custom- ers to spot errors. (Image courtesy Erich Campbell) EMBROIDERY DISASTERS

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