Sign & Digital Graphics

The 2015 LED & EMC Report

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8 • June 2015 • L E D & E M C LED/EMC A trend toward shallow-depth sig- nage in both channel letters and in sign cabinets has been building momen- tum in the industry for some time now. Traditionally, backlit channel letters have had a standard depth of five inches. The five-inch depth was (and is) an old favor- ite, but was given a permanent place in signage with the invention of the auto- matic channel letter machines, which use a five-inch coil. This innovation com- bined with specification in programs and maybe a little of the "old habits die hard" have kept the five-inch depth popular for years. Now sign companies and end users are looking for ways to distinguish them- selves from the competition; offering shallow signage is one way to do just that. Other influences for the shallow signage came from engineers and architects who prefer the thinner profiles for a cleaner look and improved aesthetics. Problems and Workarounds People have been working with these shallow depths for years and innovators have been working around the inherent problems that come with lighting for that shallow depth. Because of the nature of acrylic faces, traditional lighting sources like neon and florescent lamps have struggled with the shallow depths. Once these traditional light sources start approaching the sign face, the LED Sign Applications Shallow Signage Challenges and Solutions LED manufacturers respond to the growing popularity of shallow-depth illuminated signage B y M a r k a B e r n a t h y Mark Abernathy, director of sales for US LED, is an expert in the field of LED lighting with experience in manufacturing, fabrication and distribution in the sign industry. Shallow-depth channel letters are growing in popularity and manufacturers are meeting the need with specialized products. Here a a 2.5" deep channel letter is fitted with the Street Fighter Sidekick product from Principal LED. (Image courtesy of Principal LED) Channel letters are not only getting shallower in depth, but often thinner in width as well. (Image courtesy of Agilight)

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