Printwear

September '15

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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ule ahead of time and allow them to turn in their size breakdowns a day or two before that date. That allows schools to get the most orders possible and make more money for both us and them." However, for some members of the industry, the schedule for sport and spirit wear ebbs and flows throughout the year. Bob Krebbs, owner of Co- valent Activewear, notes that demand tends to go up any time a scholastic sport starts, be it football in fall, basketball in early winter, soccer in fall or spring, or track and field in late winter. CREATIVELY WORKING AROUND BUDGET CUTS Despite the ups and downs or onslaught of or- ders, multiple factors have also made it more difficult for apparel decorators and their dealers to sell to schools within the past several years. Lipsky explains that even with booster sales to help organizations cover the costs of their uni- form requirements, budget and funding cuts at the school level do affect dealers and decorators down the line. This is particularly true when school groups have to make the decision to order new uniforms or pieces thereof. While uniforms for many orga- nizations such as cheer squads, dance teams, and other groups were traditionally replaced every year a decade or two ago, they are now often forced to wait until budgets allow for an update. "The schools would change their uniforms every other year. That's gone to every three years, and now what's happening is that if it's replaced in 2012, they might not replace it until 2016," Lipsky says. The excep- tion to this rule are items worn close to the skin, which get replaced every year. Instead, the outermost parts of the uniform, including the shells, are cleaned and reis- sued every year. Likewise, a team or organization might only order a new individual uniform if they need one for a member who does not fit into the uniforms already available. Otherwise, they continue to replace all of the uniforms at once in a cycle of every three or four years. ule ahead of time and allow them to turn in their size breakdowns a day or two before that date. That allows schools to get the most orders possible and make However, for some members of the industry, the schedule for sport and spirit wear ebbs and flows throughout the year. Bob Krebbs, owner of Co- valent Activewear, notes that demand tends to go up any time a scholastic sport starts, be it football in fall, basketball in early winter, soccer in fall or - ders, multiple factors have also made it more ders, multiple factors have also made it more This is particularly true when school groups have to make the decision to order new uniforms or pieces thereof. While uniforms for many orga- nizations such as cheer squads, dance teams, and other groups were traditionally replaced every year a decade or two ago, they are now often forced to "The schools would change their uniforms every other year. That's gone to every three years, and now what's happening is that if it's replaced in 2012, they might not replace it until 2016," Lipsky says. The excep- tion to this rule are items worn close to the skin, which get replaced every year. Instead, the outermost parts of the uniform, including the shells, are cleaned and reis- sued every year. Likewise, a team or organization might only order a new individual uniform if they need one for a member who does not fit into the uniforms already available. Otherwise, they continue to replace all of the uniforms at once in a cycle of every three or 2 0 1 5 S E P T E M B E R P R I N T W E A R || 29 Both high school and university students appreci- ate standing out in the cheering section with bold and oversized prints. (Image courtesy of Boxercraft) BOOSTER SALES BOOSTER SALES BOOSTER SALES BOOSTER SALES

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