Sign & Digital Graphics

November '15

Issue link: http://read.uberflip.com/i/590751

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 10 of 104

6 • November 2015 • S I G N & D I G I T A L G R A P H I C S __________________________________________ Publisher James "Ruggs" Kochevar – ruggs@nbm.com Executive Editor Ken Mergentime – kenm@nbm.com Managing Editor Matt Dixon – mdixon@nbm.com Online Editor Tony Kindelspire – tkindelspire@nbm.com __________________________________________ Art Director Linda Cranston Graphic Artist Iveth Gomez Digital Versions Coordinator Susan King __________________________________________ Advertising Account Executives Kendall Buckley – Kendall@nbm.com Dan Peckham – dpeckham@nbm.com Diane Gilbert – dgilbert@nbm.com Advertising Production Coordinator Sara Siauw – ssiauw@nbm.com __________________________________________ Contributors in this Issue: Matt Charboneau; Vince DiCecco; Scott Franko; Ryan Fugler; Paula Aven Gladych; Charity Jackson; Stephen Romaniello; Bill Schiffner; Steven Vigeant; Rick Williams ___________________________________________ Vice President/Events Sue Hueg CEM, CMP – susan@nbm.com Show Sales Damon Cincotta – dcincotta@nbm.com Exhibitor Services Jackie Horn – jhorn@nbm.com ____________________________________________ National Business Media, Inc. President & CEO Robert H. Wieber Jr. Vice President/Integrated Media John Bennett Vice President/Finance Kori Gonzales, CPA Vice President/Publishing and Markets Dave Pomeroy Vice President/Audience Lori Farstad Director of IT Wolf Butler B y K E N M E R G E N T I M E e Long View Got something to say? Join the S&DG Discussion Group at: It's Always Something R unning a business such as a sign, wrap or commercial graphics shop is a challenging job; but occasionally it can be outright mad- dening. Sometimes sales are way up and you're so busy you can't find a moment to spare. Other times the sales are so far down you can't see how you're possibly going to meet your financial obligations. Stuff happens in this business that could potentially push you over the edge. A printer breaks down in the middle of a rush job and the service tech can't get there for days causing you to miss a project deadline (and a contract). An employee might show up drunk, or not show up at all due to illness. Or you may have to play go-between in a nasty dispute between a department manager and a key employee. Maybe a highly trained staffer quits just as you are heading into your busy season. What about a mistake that causes lost production, damaged customer relation- ships or corrupted files? What about those temporary power failures? Or a faulty telephone or Internet connection that wreaks havoc on your system. Or you may have to deal with an button-down venture capitalist partner who knows nothing about your business, yet insists on micromanaging it in order to meet sales projec- tions. Or maybe, while installing a full set of LED-lit channel letters, you are asked to produce your permits and learn that some key element of the recently changed code puts you in violation and you must re-install the job. Who has time for all that? These kinds of situations always reminds me of a recurring character performed by the late comedienne Gilda Radner back in early days of Saturday Night Live. This was back in the late '70s (yes, I really am that old). The character usually appeared on SNL's "Weekend Update" segment, where Gilda played the obnoxious personal advice expert Roseanne Roseannadanna. She would read "letters" from very strange people seeking personal advice. Roseanne's answer would ramble on and on, pointing out along the way some of the strange (sometimes disgusting) things we encounter in life—such as why sweater lint always finds its way into the belly button, or why a sweat ball refused to fall off the nose of Dr. Joyce Brothers at the local health club. Eventually Weekend Update co-anchor Jane Curtain would interrupt and ask what her incoherent answer had to do with the question at hand. The response from Roseanne Roseannadanna would be something like this: "You know, Jane, it just goes to show you. It's always something—if it ain't one thing, it's another." This little pearl of wisdom has stayed with me all these years—and still makes me smile when things are going wrong around me. Good luck out there! Okay, back to work.

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

view archives of Sign & Digital Graphics - November '15