Advertising Week Europe

Advertising Week Europe 2017 Official Guide

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While toying with and testing the latest shiny digital object is important, don't forget the cinema, because a whopping 78 percent of the UK population are moviegoers, according to Digital Cinema Media (DCM). And now there are new ways for adver- tisers to connect with consumers. Here's how. UNDERSTAND YOUR AUDIENCE AND WHY THEY'RE THERE The under-35 set may be on messaging apps and social media, but they also go to the movies. While they're there, they have al- ready chosen to be a captive audience ready to watch a full narrative unfold. This means that brands have a unique opportunity to tell their own story to a largely young, affluent audience—70 percent are under the age of 35—who are waiting for compelling content. "It's almost like an appointment to view," Karen Stacey, CEO of DCM says. "They've paid their money [and] they see the ad- vertisement as part of the experience. Therefore they're really receptive to it." EMBRACE STORYTELLING AND LONG- FORM CREATIVE Don't leave the 90-second spot on the cut- ting room floor—Stacey recommends using these longer lengths in cinema. In TV and digital, marketers favour short-form video spots—but as the ads get shorter and shorter, the possible impact lessens. "I think great advertising is about telling stories," Stacey says. "And I defy anyone who [says they] can tell a story between three and five seconds, which everyone's been trying to be convinced is the way to go." THINK OUTSIDE THE SCREEN Not only are audiences prepared for the ex- perience when they come to the cinema, but they're viewing content in a high-impact im- mersive environment that really brings the creative to life. Yet advertisers shouldn't see the big screen as the sole vehicle for sharing their content. Just as films have broken out of the 2D box, cinema advertising is seeing innovation that goes far beyond simple video spots. Take DCM's 2016 Airbnb campaign, which let moviegoers view two alternate realities while wearing special 3D bifocals, or the 4D Xbox ad, which incorporated rain, wind, movement, and the smell of burning rubber. "We've been a lot more dynamic around our advertising in the past year or so," Stacey says. Marketers are starting to take advan- tage of doing more in cinema. MAKE CINEMA A PRIORITY Though the reach is relatively low, Stacey says, "the impact is really high." And when cinema is strategically incorporated into the multimedia mix, it can be very powerful. DCM recommends that advertisers allocate 5 to 8 percent of their overall spend to the medium. "I think cinema can give TV cam- paigns a real wow; and you put wow first, not last," Stacey says. The bottom line? Cinema is here to stay and it's only getting better. It's one of the few outlets where the audience pays un- divided attention. "The core position...is getting stronger, not weaker," says Stacey. "Everyone else has to reinvent. If you're a newspaper, what do you look like online or on tablet? [For] TV, what [do] you do about where people are viewing you? With cinema, the audience is strong, the content is strong, and it's probably still the only place where if you did put your phone on, someone would feel the need to tap you on the shoulder and say, 'Can you turn it off, please?'" "I think cinema can give TV campaigns a real wow; and…you put wow first, not last," Karen Stacey "With cinema, the audience is strong, the content is strong, and it's probably still the only place where if you did put your phone on, someone would feel the need to tap you on the shoulder and say, ''Can you turn it off, please?'" AWE 2017 145

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