Printwear

April '17

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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Ed Levy is the director of software products at Hirsch So- lutions Inc. and owner of Digitize4u, an embroidery and digitizing operation. A 23-year industry veteran, Levy has owned screen printing, embroidery, and digitizing business- es. In 2001, Levy began consulting and founded EmbForum, a professional Tajima DG/ML by Pulse software users group. 24 || P R I N T W E A R A P R I L 2 0 1 7 THREAD ... ACCORDING TO ED B Y E D L E V Y D id you ever wonder why designs start and stop where they do? Believe it or not, there is a reason why designs have these specific locations. Most software programs will al- low you to adjust the start and stop, but in order to make those ad- justments, it is important to understand the purpose of a design's start and stop position. IMPORTANT POSITIONS Most of the time, the start and stop position of a design is auto- matically set. It is something that is not paid attention to by the average user. Start/stop positions refer to machine positioning and don't have anything to do with the pathing and sequence of the actual design. Any design can have the start and stop altered without affecting Stop Right There! Adjusting start and stop positioning Left: This start/stop dialogue box shows how the user can change the start/stop loca- tions. (All images courtesy Hirsch Solutions Inc.) Right and below left: With the start/ stop set at the bottom of the design, as seen on the cap to the right, the cap design origin setting is easy for accurate alignment on the machine. This placement works well any time precision alignment is close to the hoop or a frame is needed. Below center: This image shows the stop/start set to the design center, which is the most common posi- tion and allows for easy hoop alignment on the embroidery machine. Below right: This image indicates the bottom start/stop set in the software, which is great, especially for larger designs.

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