Sign & Digital Graphics

WRAPS '17

Issue link: http://read.uberflip.com/i/834849

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 10 of 128

6 • WRAPS • 2 0 1 7 W elcome to another issue of the annual WRAPS magazine, the only source completely dedicated to the business, design, installation and removal of WRAPS. If you're in the business, you know that the definition "wrap" can change daily. Vehicles are included, sure. But so are building exteri- ors, interiors, appliances, floors, prosthetic body parts and even coffins. For the wrap professional, the world is your oyster, and I'm looking forward to seeing my first wrapped oyster. But a serious issue has arisen in this industry, and it's born of success. The wraps market has been growing quickly, and with that comes growing pains—mainly in the area of finding qualified employees. One in five shops say it's their most pressing concern, according to our most recent survey. It's not unusual these days for shops to spend time and resources training a new installer, only to see that installer become a competitor down the line—with the only satisfaction for the original shop owner being that the former installer will eventually go through the same thing. And raise your hand if you've recruited family to help out at the shop. There has to be a better way to recruit an employee than saying, "Let's have another child." While I would love to say that schools are cranking out qualified wrap installers at a record pace, that just isn't the case. I dream of a world in which every K-12 school has its own digital printer and adhesive film supply to allow students to decorate their school's hallways, which if memory serves, could often use a little touch-up every year. The truth is that our industry is so young that very few people have any idea that jobs in the wrap-installation field exist, much less that there's a growing need for people to fill these jobs. In this magazine as well as the pages of Sign & Digital Graphics, we try to provide as much information as we can to help installers become more efficient, more precise and more profitable. Film and printer manufacturers frequently hold classes and training seminars to bring installers up to speed or make current installers more efficient. But it's just not enough to fill the growing need. More often than not, it's up to a shop to turn a green recruit into a professional installer. How do we even put out the word that we need installers? Do people outside of our industry even recognize what a vehicle graphics installer is? I see some online employment ads from wrap shops asking for people with sign experience. Some ask for people with window tint/clear bra experience. Mobile retail advertising installer? OK, these all seem like good places to start. But it's important to use the right language to avoid receiving resumes from college graduates with advertising degrees wanting $75k a year because they don't understand what you are looking for. The reason you need to bring in another installer in the first place is so you can go home to your family at a decent hour, not spend more time on paperwork. As an industry, we need to do a better job of creating a pipeline of employees to feed this growing beast. You'd think in a world where jobs don't grow on trees this wouldn't be an issue, but here we are. Have signs for your business out and promi- nently displayed when working on location. Make your shop vehicles the best piece of advertising you've ever done. Go out of your way to install a wrap at community events because the general public is still very impressed that these amazing wraps aren't paint. But most importantly, don't forget to be a true representative of just how cool these jobs are, because you never know if someone is looking on and wondering how they can become you. Vital Signs Help Wanted Ma Dixon is the managing editor of WRAPS and Sign & Digital Graphics magazine. He can be reached at mdixon@nbm.com __________________________________________ Publisher James "Ruggs" Kochevar – ruggs@nbm.com Executive Editor Ken Mergentime – kenm@nbm.com Managing Editor Matt Dixon – mdixon@nbm.com Digital Content Editor Tony Kindelspire – tkindelspire@nbm.com __________________________________________ Art Director Linda Cranston Graphic Artist Erik Wogen Digital Versions Coordinator Andrew Bennett __________________________________________ Advertising Account Executives Adam Decker – adecker@nbm.com Diane Gilbert – dgilbert@nbm.com Sara Siauw – ssiauw@nbm.com Sales Support Dana Korman – dkorman@nbm.com __________________________________________ Contributors in this Issue: Tim Boxeth and Adam Larson; Dale Dunnihoo; Casey Folk; Ryan Fugler; Charity Jackson; Justin Pate; Matt Richart; Kevin Putnam; Andy Stonehouse; Tommy Strader; Luis Tirado ___________________________________________ Vice President/Events Sue Hueg CEM, CMP – susan@nbm.com Show Sales Damon Cincotta – dcincotta@nbm.com Exhibitor Services Antoinette Vernon – avernon@nbm.com ____________________________________________ National Business Media, Inc. President & CEO Robert H. Wieber Jr. Vice President/Integrated Media John Bennett Vice President/Finance Kori Gonzales, CPA Vice President/Publishing and Markets Dave Pomeroy Vice President/Audience Lori Farstad Director of IT Wolf Butler B Y M A T T D I X O N

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

view archives of Sign & Digital Graphics - WRAPS '17