THE SHOP

October '17

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50 THE SHOP OCTOBER 2017 RESTYLING/AFTERMARKET ACCESSORIES saw project cars as a way to make money. "In college, I began building classic cars at my house on the side. I would build them and sell them, but then I ran out of room and, at the same time, I needed to fund my college education." So, he looked into the business of building drivable classic cars. It's all about looks at Apex Customs. f a dynamite look is the primary need for your super-performance vehicle, Apex Customs has all the answers. With aesthetics as its focus, one need only imagine what upgrades might make a vehicle sparkle and the good news is that the 4-year-old Phoenix shop is already way ahead of whatever you might be imagining. "We do some performance upgrades," says Tyler Copenhaver-Heath, general manager. "But the aesthetics are our main purpose—everything from graphic sys- tems to window tinting, plus racing stripes, carbon fiber hoods, powder-coating, audio, suspensions and exhausts. And we also do wheels and tires, hydrographics and auto upholstery." The work is performed by seven employees in a four-building complex that includes a 900-square-foot space for an office, waiting area and showroom; a 2,800-square-foot building for employees and where clean work is done; an upstairs section for design and cut-down; 400 square feet that houses an application booth; and a building with three bay areas for tires, paint, a workshop and a lift. CLASSIC TRAINING It all began when Copenhaver-Heath was barely out of his teens. At that time, he TOP OF ITS GAME Apex Customs keeps customers looking good. By Cathie Beck I Tyler Copenhaver-Heath, center, began building drivable classic cars in college—the start of a business that's evolved into Apex Customs in Phoenix.

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