Awards & Engraving

November '17

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44 a-e-mag.com • A&E NOVEMBER 2017 logos, as some images may need to be modi- fied by thickening lines or removing small detail. If the detail is so small it will not show up on the porous surface, it is best to modify the artwork so it will stand out after etching. The second category of natural stone is polished surfaces, such as granite, tile, and smooth river rock. Monument shops will use a 9mil or a monument-grade photoresist film for granite. This photoresist film allows them to produce detailed images that vinyl cannot achieve, and obtain depth that a monument blaster requires for their product. Generally, monument blasters will use an 80 to 100 grit aluminum oxide with their monument grade or 9mil photoresist film with a blasting pressure of 60 psi to 100 psi. Tile and river rock commonly require a surface to moderate depth etch. When sandcarving river rock or tile, you have the option of a 5mil self-stick photoresist film (additional adhesive can be applied to self- stick) for a surface etch, and the ability to etch deeper with 6mil. The artwork image can determine the mil thickness; if it is detailed then a 5mil is preferred. Increasing your blasting pressure and using a coarser abrasive will speed up the sandcarving process. We recommend 40 psi to 60 psi for sandcarving stone and 120 aluminum oxide or silicon carbide. The coarser grit will cut the stone surface Metal surfaces such as metal tumblers, flasks, knives, pewter, stainless steel, and brass can etch in seconds. Monument blasters generally use an 80 to 100 grit aluminum oxide with their monument grade or 9mil photoresist film with a blasting pressure of 60 psi to 100 psi.

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