Sign & Digital Graphics

December '17

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D I G I T A L D I E C U T T E R S First Cut is the Deepest Today's X/Y digital die cutters offer shops great versatility to tackle intricate projects Bill Schiffner is a freelance writer/editor based in Holbrook, New York. He has covered the imaging industry for more than 29 years and has reported on many evolving digital imaging technologies includ- ing wide-format printing and newer electronic digital signage. He was the editor for a number of imaging publications and websites. He can be reached at bschiffner@optonline.net. THE advance in technology, flatbed cutters are able to keep up with an onslaught of new printable materials requiring fin- ishing, through enhanced, faster motion control, as well as adding new cutting modes, such as laser cutting, plus work- flow enhancements that improve both efficiency and ease of use," he says. Meeting a Variety Finishing Options Heather Roden, strategic account manager for Zünd America in Franklin, Wisconsin, says as the lines between X/Y table cutters—better known as digi- tal die cutters—have become an essen- tial tool for serious sign shops and com- mercial graphics print providers. With a number of recent technology improve- ments, applications for these machines are growing more varied than ever. In order to check the pulse of this boom- ing market, Sign & Digital Graphics spoke with some suppliers and end users to dis- cuss some of the latest advancements as well as the many projects that are pos- sible with theses versatile machines. "Over the past few years, this cat- egory is helping to change the land- scape of the finishing market," reports Steve Aranoff, vice president of business development and marketing for MCT Digital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. "By continuing to DIGITAL PRINTING AND FINISHING DIGITAL GRAPHICS S I G N & D I G I T A L G R A P H I C S • December 2017 • 33 B Y B I L L S C H I F F N E R "The Kongsberg C tables can be configured for milling applications ranging from sporadic, light-duty routing to lengthy jobs working with heavy-duty materials—all with exceptional productivity," says Esko's George Folickman. (Image courtesy of Esko)

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