Sign & Digital Graphics

December '17

Issue link: http://read.uberflip.com/i/904525

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 72 of 88

66 • December 2017 • S I G N & D I G I T A L G R A P H I C S SPECIALTY IMAGING DIGITAL GRAPHICS you can dial in settings to cut through only the top layer. With a separate set- ting, you can dial it in for two layers and not the third, and the last setting will cut through all three layers, he says. "Lasers and textiles are really becom- ing super popular within the last two or three years," says Amy Dallman, mar- keting communications specialist for Epilog Laser in Golden, Colo. She says that the industry has seen an influx of laser-friendly heat transfer material, which can be cut into words or different graphics and then put on T-shirts with a heat press. "If you have a huge run to do, 50 guys, this might not be time effective for you, but if you have a special promotion, doing 10 shirts or five shirts for a bowl- ing team, this is a fast and effective way to make custom T-shirts," she says. The whole process of laser engraving fabric is "just a lot of fun," Dallman says. Epilog has lasered designs on canvas shoes. The company has a client that uses its laser to cut intricate patterns into leather shoes. Another client makes steam punk clothing, like bowler hats and leather cuffs, wallets and purses with their laser engraver. "It's really cool. With cot- ton and denim, when you laser engrave it, it actually produces a bleached effect, where a lot of our things will produce a darker mark," Dallman says. Epilog's machines go up to 1,000 dpi on its entry-level systems and 1,200 dpi on its larger more expensive laser sys- tems. "For fabric, we recommend using low dpi, around 300 for your sturdier fab- rics like denim, cotton or canvas, or 150 dpi for something like fleece," Dallman says. "The dpi has an impact because the more dots per inch you are engraving, the more area you are covering. If you reduce that, it reduces the chances of burning through the fabric." Clients are constantly asking how to laser engrave on new materials, like satin. Photo courtesy of Epilog Laser Photo courtesy of Epilog Laser Photo courtesy of Epilog Laser Photo courtesy of Epilog Laser

Articles in this issue

view archives of Sign & Digital Graphics - December '17