Printwear

February '18

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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48 || P R I N T W E A R F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 ART STYLES AND TECHNIQUES N o one is good at everything, and this principle also applies to artists. Most artists have a few styles in which they are most proficient. Examples include cartoon, realistic, abstract, folk art, art deco, retro/ vintage, contemporary, digital grunge, Victorian, psychedelic, and many more. When creating artwork for a client, one of the most important things to find out is the art style the customer wants. In many cases, the client is not going to know, so having examples to display of past jobs that are similar or that show a range of styles will be helpful in narrowing down choices. In addition to art styles, artists usually are proficient in a variety of mediums but not all mediums. Examples here might include digital art (the entire design is done on a computer), col- ored pencils, pen and ink, oils, acrylic paint, airbrush, charcoal, etc. When creating an original design, the artist may first create it in one of these me- diums and then scan it into the computer to convert it into the format needed for the cho- sen decorating process. So, when you look at an artist's portfolio, be sure to look to see if the art- ist is proficient in a medium that is going to work for the type of artwork you are looking for. A third consideration is that some artists spe- cialize in drawing, some in designing and some are what is commonly called a "production art- ist." Just because an artist is proficient in paint- ing and drawing does not mean they will be good at design and vice versa. In many shops, you will need to have both skill sets, so this may mean having more than one person. If you are a contract decorator who always gets ready-to-go artwork, perhaps you will need only a production artist. This is someone proficient in the graphics software who can process designs but may not necessarily be all that skilled at drawing or designing. o one is good at everything, and this principle also applies to artists. Most artists have a few styles in which they are most proficient. Examples include cartoon, realistic, abstract, folk art, art deco, retro/ one of the most important things to find out is the art style the customer wants. In many cases, the client is not going to know, so having examples to display of past jobs that are similar or that show a range of styles will be helpful in narrowing down choices. In addition to art styles, artists usually diums and then scan it into the computer to convert it into the format needed for the cho- sen decorating process. So, when you look at an artist's portfolio, be sure to look to see if the art- that is going to take the longest to do. Most likely, it will have fine details and require separations if it is screen printed. It may have more colors or require color matching. Realistic artwork generally takes the longest. An example might be a portrait or a full-scene illustration. It might also entail more so- phisticated multimedia such as screen printing or digitally printing a back- ground image and then overlaying it with embroidery, appliqué, or vinyl. This is the type of artwork where digital direct-to-garment printing really shines, and this type of design is much easier to execute using digital printing versus screen printing. More than any other process, digital printing is great for a design with lots of colors, fine detail, and photographs. However, for high volume, screen printing may still be the better choice. In your search for finding the best solution for your business, knowing what you need and how fast you will need it is critical to choosing the best option. FINDING GREAT ARTWORK Realistic artwork features a lot of detail, which makes it one of the most time-consuming types of artwork to do. It is the style used when a client wants a specific model of car or animal and usually research must be done to find reference photos to use in creating the piece.

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