Printwear

May '18

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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2 0 1 8 M A Y P R I N T W E A R || 25 use vector software, but I wasn't a trained designer, and wondered if I belonged. Awkward as I felt, the art director was relieved. He stopped me mid-setup to say, "They wanted me to learn all that on top of what I'm doing, but when I tried it was like a different world." I'm not here to tell you he was wrong. This 'world' didn't feel like the overwhelming burden he felt it would be. I had dabbled in graphics and paper printing previously, but when I saw machine embroidery, the 'different world' I saw was one of endless possibility. I could create something tactile in a way that digital design had never before allowed. If you feel the same, embrace the distortion and im- perfection. Immerse yourself in embroidery, and you'll find a unique medium of expression that opens you to satisfying new methods of decoration while opening your shop to a world of artistry, possibility, and profit in their embroidery. standing how to interpret a design into stitches, such as why one uses a stitch type, why a certain stitch angle is pref- erable to another, how dense stitches should be to provide adequate cov- erage, and on and on. Add the func- tional questions about distortion, like how much wider should I make this element to compensate for pull distor- tion, how far outside the edge of this element should my outline be to ac- count for push distortion, and it can get quite complicated. These artistic and technical questions benefit greatly from experience. Though good educators can give you baseline set- tings and hints as to how what shapes require a certain stitch type, or how you should sequence elements, the best way to internalize the nature of embroidery is first-hand experience. This is the key. Be- hind a screen, you can forget that you are controlling a machine. Operating the ma- chine makes your digitizing real. You feel the pain of errors, see the effect of your choices, and gain a clearer understanding of these complex interactions. A DIFFERENT WORLD When I first officially became I digitizer, I was moved into the art room. I could THE DISCIPLINES OF LEARNING TO DIGITIZE 1. Software skills. Unfortunately, this usually takes new digitizers' fo- cus. They've seen some embroidery, and they want to know what buttons to push to place the stitches or which will bring up the pen tool they already understand how to use. This knowledge is the easiest to learn, and it shouldn't take more than perusal of the help files and some support videos from your vendor. Knowing where tools are located is simple enough, and though the number of tools can seem overwhelming, you'll likely use less than 10 pri- mary tools and a few docking menus to do 80 percent of your ev- eryday logo digitizing. The critical stitch types and drawing tools can be addressed easily without knowing every tool, and most digitizers will never use all the tools available in a software suite. 2. Embroidery experience. The hardest part of digitizing is under- Vastex light-, medium- and heavy-duty screen printing equipment lines include: presses in 1 to 10 stations/colors, athletic numbering systems, infrared conveyor dryers, flash cure units, LED exposing units, screen drying cabinets, screen registration systems, wash-out booths and utility equipment. Vastex light-, medium- and heavy-duty screen printing equipment lines include: presses in 1 to 10 stations/colors, athletic numbering systems, infrared conveyor dryers, flash cure units, LED exposing units, screen drying cabinets, screen registration systems, wash-out booths and utility equipment. Vastex light-, medium- and heavy-duty screen printing equipment lines include: presses in 1 to 10 Vastex light-, medium- and heavy-duty screen printing equipment lines include: presses in 1 to 10 Rockets ink temps up to 350°F in the first several inches and holds at-cure temps longer for the highest possible rates. Digital temp control of 3 height- adjustable heaters maximize efficiency for each ink type. Cure 720+ plastisol-printed garments/h, 240+ water-based or discharge-printed garments/h, and 100+ garments/h inkjet printed with white ink. 30 and 54 inch wide models. OF PLASTISOL, WATER-BASED, DISCHARGE AND DTG WHITE INK 1-800 4 VASTEX +1-610-434-6004 SALES@VASTEX.COM VASTEX.COM FF-0673 Mix & match chambers and conveyor extensions for Limitless Possibilities! Made in USA

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