Printwear

May '18

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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56 || P R I N T W E A R M A Y 2 0 1 8 make certain that the needle will not hit the hoop while stitching. Using the tracing fea- ture of your machine will guard against this. The use of a stabilizer will make certain that there is no movement in the bag as it is em- broidered. As you move away from center, and if there is any play at all in the fabric of the bag, your choice of backing or topping will help to stabilize it. ABOUT STABILIZERS Backing is not only an aid in stabilizing the item you are about to embroider; it is also an aid in hooping properly. By stabilizing the fabric as it is hooped, the right stabilizer will prevent stretching, puckering, and dis- tortion. Use a piece of backing that extends beyond the sides of the hoop, so that it is se- cured along with your bag within the hoop. One of the nicest aspects of embroider- ing bags is that the bags tend to be sturdy enough to allow for the use of a tearaway. This is usually a favorite since it saves on production time. Canvas bags are a tight enough weave that they will not noticeably stretch during hoop- ing and a medium, 1.5-oz. tearaway backing will work well to stabilize hooping and help the design last as long as the bag. Rarely will a water-soluble topping be necessary for em- broidering on tote bags. But, if the design itself appears light and there is any chance of stitches being "lost" in the fabric, it would be a good decision to use a piece. On page 54 is an example of a a rather straightforward canvas tote job. The Elegant Elephant design is centered on one side of the bag. The bag and a piece of 1.5-oz. tear- away backing were hooped together prior to embroidering. It is stitched in rayon em- broidery thread, which is soft enough to lay into intricate designs, while sturdy enough to withstand every day handling. When the stitching was complete, all the backing was torn away, leaving no residual pieces. For another essentially centered design, Never More, seen to the left, was hooped with a piece of 1.5-oz. tearaway in a hoop that secured the bag for embroidery. The canvas is sturdy, as is the design, including the outline stitches that give a feathery ap- pearance to the raven. After stitching out the design, the backing was easily ripped away. Some residual backing was left in the narrow "Vs" of some of the feathering where the stitches are lighter. In the final example of a traditional tote bag, the Sports Balls design was embroi- dered on a less expensive, non-woven tote that is often used as a giveaway or for gro- HOOPING & STABILIZING TOTE BAGS The canvas bag is sturdy, as is the design, including the outline stitches that give a feathery appearance to the raven. After stitching out the design, the 1.5-oz. tearaway backing was easily ripped away. However, some residual backing was left in the narrow "Vs" of some of the feathering where the stitches are lighter. This non-woven tote is often used as a giveaway.

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