Printwear

July '18

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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26 || P R I N T W E A R J U LY 2 0 1 8 Above: With stitch viewing turned off, you can see how the work file contains the shapes drawn by the digitizer that define each stitch element. Right: On the top is the native or 'work' file that is created in embroidery software. It con- tains color information, and each ele- ment can be edited by working with its vector-like outline and stipulating stitch characteristics. On the bottom is a standard DST machine file, which does not store color information and only contains the coordinates of the end- points of each stitch, as well as function codes like color changes and trims. THE PROS OF RELEASING FILES The upside to releasing your files is primarily in the positive percep- tion of customers. If they feel free to leave, they are less likely to weigh your shop against another at the initial point of purchase be- cause they take comfort that one order doesn't require a larger com- mitment. Moreover, you seem confident in your willingness to stake their future business on the value of your decoration and service alone. This also means that customers leaving in search of a bargain or other convenience are more likely to return should the quality of the experience or product provided by your competitor compare poorly to yours. THE PROS OF RETENTION If a customer wants your particular design, to avoid fees levied by the next shop or needs a fast turnaround, they may be more likely to use your services than switch to your competition. Those skilled with digitizing or who have produced work with a unique style or technique can use file retention to establish themselves as exclusive providers of that style/quality in their area and may retain customers if other decorators can't match what that unique technique provides. This quality/scarcity model may be the most viable method of re- taining a customer's file without complaint, but it, like all methods, is working toward the primary benefit of retention, keeping the cus- tomer locked in for future orders. THE CONS OF RELEASING FILES Customers are free to leave. Constant price-shoppers may take your file to the cheapest decorator. Once you release your digitized file, ERICH'S EMBELLISHMENTS Above left: If you attempt to select a shape on the machine file, you'll see that without reprocessing, you can only access the end points of each stitch. Above: With stitch viewing turned off, you can see how the work file contains the shapes drawn by the digitizer that define each stitch element. Left: With the native file, any shop using the same software that you used to create a design can edit shapes. Stitch types, angles, compen- sation, and even the shape of the element are easily altered.

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