Printwear

July '18

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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2 0 1 8 J U LY P R I N T W E A R || 47 erything from better wages to heightened environmental regulations are require- ments for U.S. apparel manufacturers, which helps shops forward the message of a conscious and often more sustainable product. Many garments made overseas are produced in countries with less strict regulations, so domestic goods erase the "gray area" when it comes to tracing a sup- ply chain, verifying a manufacturer's best practices, and knowing what their waste or consumption patterns are. "People need to understand what they buy should stand for what they support," says Tabitha Vo- gelsong, Upcycle. Along with an ethically-sound product, sources point out that a sizeable advantage to shops working with American-made goods is the flexibility with turnaround times and customization. With shipping times increasing on imported items from countries such as China, customers are now turning stateside, says Vogelsong. By order- ing domestically, customers have the benefit of other options like lower minimums, test pieces, and faster reordering. Hughes notes that with the higher price per-piece with domestic apparel, buyers can expect to get a better product for their money, even if it's at smaller quantities. This is because, at the manufacturer level, there is no room for spoilage in a Made-in-USA apparel operation. "It puts the onus on the manufacturer to create something consis- tent and high-quality." Running a large or- der where the cost is four dollars per shirt, he explains, means a three-percent defect rate is going to be much costlier than an overseas manufacturer. Because of that need to be consistent, most U.S. operations use the most up-to-date machinery over hand- cutting and sewing. And while all these items are key selling points for shops looking to add American- made brands to their apparel offerings, sources point out that there are still chal- lenges at the manufacturer level. Overhead, parties agree, is generally the biggest hurdle continued on page 79 Vastex light-, medium- and heavy-duty screen printing equipment lines include: presses in 1 to 10 stations/colors, athletic numbering systems, infrared conveyor dryers, flash cure units, LED exposing units, screen drying cabinets, screen registration systems, wash-out booths and utility equipment. Vastex light-, medium- and heavy-duty screen printing equipment lines include: presses in 1 to 10 stations/colors, athletic numbering systems, infrared conveyor dryers, flash cure units, LED exposing units, screen drying cabinets, screen registration systems, wash-out booths and utility equipment. Vastex light-, medium- and heavy-duty screen printing equipment lines include: presses in 1 to 10 Vastex light-, medium- and heavy-duty screen printing equipment lines include: presses in 1 to 10 Rockets ink temps up to 350°F in the first several inches and holds at-cure temps longer for the highest possible rates. Digital temp control of 3 height- adjustable heaters maximize efficiency for each ink type. Cure 720+ plastisol-printed garments/h, 240+ water-based or discharge-printed garments/h, and 100+ garments/h inkjet printed with white ink. 30 and 54 inch wide models. OF PLASTISOL, WATER-BASED, DISCHARGE AND DTG WHITE INK 1-800 4 VASTEX +1-610-434-6004 SALES@VASTEX.COM VASTEX.COM FF-0673 Mix & match chambers and conveyor extensions for Limitless Possibilities! Made in USA

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