Printwear

July '18

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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L ike any piece of shop equip- ment, an automatic screen- printing press is a purchase that demands some preliminary re- search and training once it's on- site. Whether it's a manual screen printer adding one to streamline productivity or a busy shop adding another production shift, sometimes the temptation to print more, faster, over- shadows some of the crucial foundations of running an auto press. Printwear spoke with a few industry veterans on the most common mistakes shops make and how to avoid some of these missteps. GETTING IT IN THE DOOR Before a drop of ink is squee- geed or a shirt is loaded onto a platen, shops tend to make their biggest mistake before they even get their new auto press onto the production floor. Multiple par- ties contend that when the truck carrying the press pulls up to the loading dock, it's an all hands on- deck scenario. "I think they (shop owners) have to understand what they need in their facility to even accept a delivery like this," ex- plains Brad Carter, Workhorse Products. Unlike some smaller pieces of ma- chinery around a decorator's shop, an auto press is typically much heavier and bulkier. To be prepared for delivery, shops should have the right tools in place when their shipment arrives. This means having a forklift or pallet jack ready to unload the press, personnel capable of handling the lift, and an unclut- tered area for unloading. If the shop doesn't have a loading dock with clearance for the shipping truck, other considerations may be necessary, like a ramp that can withstand the weight of the press and pallet. This allows the shop crew to safely roll the press off the truck and in through the shop doors. Once the heavy lifting is sort- ed out, sources encourage shops to adhere to standard receiving protocol for the press. This includes reviewing the packing slip and justi- fying it with the shipment to make sure the product is what the shop ordered, inspecting the packaging for any damage, and checking the press itself for any noticeable damage that may have occurred in transit. In most cases, a reli- able seller will ship the press securely, but taking these preliminary steps avoids any unpleasant surprises by simply receiving the item sight unseen. In addition to inspecting the press and order slip, knowing the fine print before the press arrives will help avoid any unexpected li- ability issues. "Sometimes a company might want to come and do the (install) themselves," explains Josh Wells, Ryonet. chinery around a decorator's shop, an auto press is typically much heavier and bulkier. standard receiving protocol for the press. This includes reviewing the packing slip and justi fying it with the shipment to make sure the product is what the shop ordered, inspecting the packaging for any damage, and checking the press itself for any noticeable damage that may have occurred in transit. In most cases, a reli able seller will ship the press securely, but taking these preliminary steps avoids any unpleasant surprises by simply receiving the item sight unseen. In addition to inspecting the press and order slip, knowing the fine print before the press arrives will help avoid any unexpected li ability issues. "Sometimes a company might want to come and do the (install) themselves," explains Josh Wells, Ryonet. Automatic for the People Five common mistakes shops make with automatic presses B Y M I K E C L A R K Shops should check the fine print on the press they've purchased in case the manufacturer prefers to send a technician for the install. (Image courtesy Workhorse Products) Routine main- tenance is a must for any press regardless of shop size or volume. (Im- age courtesy Lawson Screen & Digital Products) 48 || P R I N T W E A R J U LY 2 0 1 8

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